Saturday, September 26, 2009

Love versus Fear....Bible Study for Autismspeaks!

Bible Study for Autism Speaks:


Fear hath torment. Because it fills us with forebodings.







NIV© There is no fear in love. But perfect love drives out fear, because fear has to do with punishment. The one who fears is not made perfect in love.
NAS© There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear involves punishment, and the one who fears is not perfected in love.
ISV© There is no fear where love exists. Rather, perfect love banishes fear, for fear involves punishment, and the person who lives in fear has not been perfected in love.
GWT© No fear exists where his love is. Rather, perfect love gets rid of fear, because fear involves punishment. The person who lives in fear doesn't have perfect love.
KJV There is no fear in love; but perfect love casteth out fear: because fear hath torment. He that feareth is not made perfect in love.
AKJ There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear: because fear has torment. He that fears is not made perfect in love.
ASV There is no fear in love: but perfect love casteth out fear, because fear hath punishment; and he that feareth is not made perfect in love.
BBE There is no fear in love: true love has no room for fear, because where fear is, there is pain; and he who is not free from fear is not complete in love.
DRB Fear is not in charity: but perfect charity casteth out fear, because fear hath pain. And he that feareth, is not perfected in charity.
DBY There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear; for fear has torment, and he that fears has not been made perfect in love.
ERV There is no fear in love: but perfect love casteth out fear, because fear hath punishment; and he that feareth is not made perfect in love.
WBS There is no fear in love; but perfect love casteth out fear: because fear hath torment. He that feareth, is not made perfect in love.
WEY Love has in it no element of fear; but perfect love drives away fear, because fear involves pain, and if a man gives way to fear, there is something imperfect in his love.
WEB There is no fear in love; but perfect love casts out fear, because fear has punishment. He who fears is not made perfect in love.
YLT fear is not in the love, but the perfect love doth cast out the fear, because the fear hath punishment, and he who is fearing hath not been made perfect in the love;

8 comments:

Mrs. C said...

Ah... though methinks love doth not fill the coffers of an organization so well as fear.

Great post!!!

r.b. said...

Hi, Mrs. C! Out of all the wisdom of the bible, that one strikes me as most profound....Fear and love don't mix!!!

Stephanie said...

A point very well made! Even if one sees autism as a disability, that disability is part (not all, but part) of who the person is. How can you fear the disability and love the person?

Should one fear blindness? Not going blind, but blindness itself? Should one fear deafness? Should one fear paraplegia?

Autism isn't some malignant force that hunts down your child. Nor is it a contagion. Autism isn't coming to get them.

r.b. said...

Stephanie:

People who are fearful can be easily manipulated. They are sheep looking for anyone who promises to be a shepherd. The less they have to think, the better...it's sad, isn't it?

Stephanie said...

It is sad, both for the parents and for the children. I remember how it goes. When my first son was diagosed (7 years ago), the doctor gave us this dire prognosis and told us we should institutionalize him "to be fair to our other children."

The moment came when we were at a serious weak point, because we'd been there for hours with two toddlers with special needs and my step-son, plus I was 8 months pregnant. We were exhausted and bleary-eyed, and my newly diagnosed autistic child was about a half an hour into a meltdown.

As weak and tired as I was, his words snapped my spine to steel. But other people cave in, because they don't know there are alternatives. They don't know doctors are fallible. And they think normal is better.

As easy as it is to be angry or disgusted with these parents (been there, done that), these parents need and deserve to be reached by people with a different message in a way they can understand...for their children if nothing else.

r.b. said...

That's why I came to the Hub. I confess I was one of those parents who demonized my child out of fear. I wasn't as strong as you. I thought of him as the sweetest thing one day, and the next, post diagnosis, I became a crusader who was going to rid my child of autism. I held on to those fears a very long time, thus, I KNOW of love versus fear very much on a personal level. I sure as hell aint no hero!!!

But I look back, and realize I did the best I could. Even in fear, I gave Ben everything I possibly could within our means. I worked a LOT with him, and always tried to look for the reasons for his behavior. Even at that, I have some regrets, mostly isolated incidents where I just lost my patience, which has grown considerably over the years.
these parents need and deserve to be reached by people with a different message in a way they can understand

EXACTLY. I had to hunt for a different message, and how I got here is just weird. Actually, Estee led me here with a google of "joy" and "autism". And I found Bonnie, who introduced me to Kev. I found that there were actual ADULTS with autism...this is NOT something you see on the fear pages much. It is getting better, though, as more people think it through.

Stephanie said...

"I wasn't as strong as you. ... I sure as hell aint no hero!!!"

You probably didn't have the experience I did, either. I have known people with depression and bi-polar disorder since adolescence, and by "know" I mean close friends, my best friend, and my husband. I knew they were marginalized and mistreated in ways that didn't reflect their real abilities. I knew there was prejudice and stigma. And I knew doctors and their prognoses were fallible. I also know that, while not on the autism spectrum as it is currently defined, I'm "different" and am treated badly for being different, but being treated badly doesn't mean I'm bad or deficient.

I'm not a hero. But I hope I can be a mediator who can effectively reach out to both sides of the community to help share the very different points of view.

"But I look back, and realize I did the best I could."

And that's the important thing. I've made mistakes; anyone who claims they haven't is either unaware of the unintended consequences of their own actions or lying.

There's so much blame going around. Parents who want normal children blame the autism for not getting what they want. Autistics who want equality blame parents who are afraid. Parents fighting for the child but against autism blame autistics for making it more difficult. There's a lot of blame. It's a very emotional issue. Which makes genuine communication very difficult.

Stephanie said...

Oh, and I had to hunt for a different message to know there were others who felt like I did. Estee was one of the first people I found, too!

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